BAYPORT-BLUE POINT

Library’s septic project pushed to a new committee

Ten water-quality projects recommended for funding

Randall Waszynski
Posted 2/20/20

An application submitted by Bayport-Blue Point Library to the Suffolk County Water Quality Protection and Restoration Program Committee for an upgraded septic system at its purchased property on …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in
BAYPORT-BLUE POINT

Library’s septic project pushed to a new committee

Ten water-quality projects recommended for funding

Posted

An application submitted by Bayport-Blue Point Library to the Suffolk County Water Quality Protection and Restoration Program Committee for an upgraded septic system at its purchased property on Middle Road is one of four projects redirected to the Sewer Infrastructure Committee.

The committee makes recommendations for a separate fund that is more specific to these types of projects and will meet on March 5 in Hauppauge.

“The Bayport-Blue Point Library looks forward to working with the county’s Sewer Infrastructure Committee to approve our funding request,” said Mike Firestone, the library’s director. “We have been very fortunate to have the strong support of Suffolk County presiding officer Rob Calarco, along with several major environmental organizations. The library is committed to being a fervent steward of the environment as well as a leader in providing state-of-the-art library services to the community.”

Additionally, 10 of 21 applications requesting funding from Suffolk County for various water-quality improvements were recommended last Thursday.

Although the committee cited a $1.5 million cap for funding at a meeting in January, the total cost of the 10 applications recommended topped $1.7 million.

“We decided that we could do more because we are getting back $1 million to the fund in closing out some previous projects,” said Frank Castelli, the program’s director, adding that the majority of that money coming back was from projects from multiple years back. “Because we are putting approximately $1 million back in the fund, we have allowed ourselves to go a little bit higher on the recommendations.”

Applications recommended for funding by the committee span across the county and were submitted by multiple townships, incorporated villages, and other interested parties. One of the 10 recommendations was submitted by the county Department of Public Works to remove invasive plant species from Great Patchogue Lake, an application requesting $250,000 from the county.

Another notable recommendation from the committee was submitted by the Town of Brookhaven for stormwater and flood mitigation at Patchogue Bay. Carrying out the project would allow for the filtration and collection of sediments before they enter the bay. It would reduce nitrogen discharge in the bay by approximately 46 percent, reduce sediment discharge by 81 percent, reduce phosphorus discharge by 52 percent, and reduce biochemical oxygen demand by almost 63 percent. This application also requests $250,000 from the county.

Although some projects were rejected funding, several others not recommended were redirected for recommendation to other county funds, considering these projects’ contents. Multiple projects were pushed to a fund that considers projects requesting additional funding to an ongoing project. n

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment